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Nasdaq Rebounds 1% Wednesday After Touching New 2022 Low, but Trading Is Volatile

Rebekah Fuller

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U.S. stocks rose Wednesday as the market attempted to recover from April’s technology-led sell-off a day after the Nasdaq Composite posted a new low for the year.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose about 150 points, or 0.5%. The S&P 500 gained 0.5%. The Nasdaq Composite ticked up 0.7%.

“We remain cautious on rallies here,” BTIG’s Jonathan Krinsky said in a note to clients. “There still hasn’t been a full-scale washout, in our view, and trends remain to the downside. This means small rallies don’t do much other than alleviate short-term oversold conditions.”

Microsoft’s shares jumped more than 3% after the company beat analyst expectations on the top and bottom lines. The company also issued forward revenue guidance exceeding analyst forecasts.

However, Google parent Alphabet’s earnings results missed consensus estimates. Management warned on the conference call of another potentially weak quarter ahead. Alphabet shares fell about 4%.

“We’re trying to find a place of stability,” Kari Firestone, chairman and CEO of Aureus Asset Management, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “We need to see a few more names come in with really strong, reliable and sustainable earnings so investors can get back on board.”

The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite has dropped further into bear market territory, losing 3.95% on Tuesday and hitting a fresh low for the year. That was its biggest daily loss since September 2020. The index is now sitting now roughly 22% off its high. The S&P 500 on Tuesday posted its worst performance since March and closed below a key support level of 4200.

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In April, the S&P 500 is down about 7%, the Nasdaq has lost about 11%, and the Dow has declined more than 3%.

“The confluence of persistent inflation, Fed tightening, the war in Ukraine, and China’s zero-Covid policy lockdowns has manifested in tenacious headwinds for investors in April,” Art Hogan, National Securities chief market strategist, said.

Meanwhile, shares of Robinhood shed about 3% on Wednesday after the retail brokerage said it is cutting back on staff. The company cited “duplicate roles and job functions” after its rapid expansion last year.

Boeing saw shares fall 5% after an earnings miss.

Facebook parent Meta is set to report earnings Wednesday after the bell, with Apple and Amazon reporting earnings Thursday. Investors will be watching to see if tech companies’ results prove the intense selling in April has been misplaced.

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Source: cnbc.com

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Ukraine’s Zelenskyy Tells Davos Supplies of Western Tanks Must Outpace Another Russian Offensive

Rebekah Fuller

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“Mobilization of the world must outpace a next military mobilization of our joint enemy,” Zelenskyy said via videoconference at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy on Wednesday said the supplies of Western tanks must outpace another Russian attack, reviving Kyiv’s push for the delivery of heavily armored vehicles amid fears the Kremlin could soon launch a new mobilization drive.

“Mobilization of the world must outpace a next military mobilization of our joint enemy,” Zelenskyy said via videoconference at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

“The supplying of Ukraine with air defense systems must outpace Russia’s next missile attacks. The supplies of Western tanks must outpace another invasion of Russian tanks.”

“The restoration of security and peace in Ukraine must outpace Russia’s attacks on security and peace in other countries. A tribunal for military crimes must prevent new ones,” Zelenskyy said.

His comments come amid speculation that Russian President Vladimir Putin may be poised to announce another mobilization round.

Analysts at the Institute for the Study of War, a U.S.-based think tank, said Tuesday that Putin may announce “a second mobilization wave in the coming days, possibly as soon as January 18.”

Zelenskyy and senior Ukrainian officials have repeatedly urged Western allies to provide heavy military vehicles and weapons in order to help defeat Russia’s nearly year-long onslaught.

Poland, France and the U.K. have recently pledged to send tanks to the Ukrainian military, while Finland says it could also donate a small number of German-made Leopard 2 tanks to help Kyiv protect itself.

Germany’s government said last week, however, that it has no plans to provide Ukraine with the Leopard 2 tanks.

‘Another horrible day for Ukraine’

Earlier on Wednesday, the three main figures of Ukraine’s Interior Ministry died in a helicopter crash in a suburb of the capital Kyiv.

The helicopter fell near a kindergarten and a residential building in Brovary with the cause of the crash being investigated.

Ukraine’s Interior Minister Denys Monastyrskyi, First Deputy Minister Yevhenii Yenin and the Interior Ministry’s State Secretary Yurii Lubkovych were among those killed in the crash.

Ukrainian authorities said at least 14 people died in the crash. Initially, reports indicated 18 people had died in the crash, although this has since been revised.

Zelenskyy described the incident as a “tragedy” and led delegates at Davos in a minute’s silence “to honor the memory of every person Ukraine has lost.”

Separately, Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska said at a news conference that it was “another horrible day for Ukraine.”

— CNBC’s Holly Ellyatt contributed to this report.

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Original Post: cnbc.com

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Holiday Sales Fall Short of Expectations, Set Stage for Tougher 2023 for Retailers

Rebekah Fuller

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Shoppers walk through the Urbanspace Holiday Shops at Bryant Park in New York, U.S., on Sunday, Dec. 12, 2021.
Gabby Jones | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Holiday sales fell short of industry expectations, as shoppers felt pinched by inflation and rising interest rates, according to data from the National Retail Federation.

Sales during November and December grew 5.3% year over year to $936.3 billion, below the major trade group’s prediction for growth of between 6% and 8% over the year prior. In early November, NRF had projected spending of between $942.6 billion and $960.4 billion.

The sales forecast excludes spending at automobile dealers, gasoline stations and restaurants.

The gains include the impact of inflation, too, which drives up total sales. The consumer price index, which measures the cost of a broad mix of goods and services, was up 6.5% in December compared with a year ago, according to the Labor Department.

For retailers, the shopping season’s results reflect the challenges ahead. As Americans continue to pay higher prices for groceries, housing and more month after month, they are racking up credit card balances, spending down savings and having fewer dollars for discretionary spending.

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.

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Microsoft, Amazon and Other Tech Companies Have Laid Off More Than 60,000 Employees in the Last Year

Rebekah Fuller

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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella speaks at the company’s Ignite Spotlight event in Seoul on Nov. 15, 2022.
SeongJoon Cho | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The job cuts in tech land are piling up, as companies that led the 10-year bull market adapt to a new reality.

Microsoft said Wednesday that it’s letting go of 10,000 employees, which will reduce the company’s headcount by less than 5%. Amazonfresh round of job cuts Wednesday that are expected to eliminate more than 18,000 employees and become the largest workforce reduction in the e-retailer’s 28-year history.

The layoffs come in a period of slowing growth, higher interest rates to battle inflation, and fears of a possible recession next year.

Here are some of the major cuts in the tech industry so far. All numbers are approximations based on filings, public statements, and media reports:

Microsoft: 10,000 jobs cut

Microsoft is cutting 10,000 employees through March 31 as the software maker braces for slower revenue growth. The company is also taking a $1.2 billion charge.

“I’m confident that Microsoft will emerge from this stronger and more competitive,” CEO Satya Nadella announced the move in a memo to employees that was posted on Microsoft’s website Wednesday. The move will reduce Microsoft’s headcount by less than 5%, and some employees will find out this week if they’re losing their jobs, he wrote.

Amazon: 18,000 jobs cut

Earlier this month, Amazonsaid the company was planning to lay off more than 18,000 employees, primarily in its human resources and stores divisions. It came after Amazon said in November it was looking to cut staff, including in its devices and recruiting organizations. CNBC reported at the time that the company was looking to lay off about 10,000 employees.

Amazon went on a hiring spree during the Covid-19 pandemic. The company’s global workforce swelled to more than 1.6 million by the end of 2021, up from 798,000 in the fourth quarter of 2019.

Alphabet (Verily): 230 jobs cut

Google parent company Alphabet15% of employees from its health sciences division Verily. Google itself has not undertaken any significant layoffs as of Jan. 18, but employees are increasingly growing worried that the axe may soon fall.

Crypto.com: 500 jobs cut

Crypto.com announced plans to lay off 20% of its workforce Jan. 13. The company had 2,450 employees, according to PitchBook data, suggesting around 490 employees were laid off.

CEO Kris Marszalek said in a blog post that the crypto exchange grew “ambitiously” but was unable to weather the collapse of Sam Bankman-Fried’s crypto empire FTX without the further cuts.

“All impacted personnel have already been notified,” Marszalek said in a post.

Coinbase: 2,000 jobs cut

On Jan. 10, Coinbasecut about a fifth of its workforce as it looks to preserve cash during the crypto market downturn.

The exchange plans to cut 950 jobs, according to a blog post. Coinbase, which had roughly 4,700 employees as of the end of September, had already slashed 18% of its workforce in June saying it needed to manage costs after growing “too quickly” during the bull market.

“With perfect hindsight, looking back, we should have done more,” CEO Brian Armstrong told CNBC in a phone interview at the time. “The best you can do is react quickly once information becomes available, and that’s what we’re doing in this case.”

Salesforce: 7,000 jobs cut

Salesforce is cutting 10% of its personnel and reducing some office space as part of a restructuring plan, the company announced Jan. 4. The company employed more than 79,000 workers as of December.

In a letter to employees, co-CEO Marc Benioff said customers have been more “measured” in their purchasing decisions given the challenging macroeconomic environment, which led Salesforce to make the “very difficult decision” to lay off workers.

Salesforce will record charges of $1.0 billion to $1.4 billion related to the headcount reductions, and $450 million to $650 million related to the office space reductions, the company said.

Meta: 11,000 jobs cut

Facebook parent Metamost significant round of layoffs ever in November. The company said it plans to eliminate 13% of its staff, which amounts to more than 11,000 employees.

Meta

The tech giant’s cuts come after it expanded headcount by about 60% during the pandemic. The business has been hurt by competition from rivals such as TikTok, a broad slowdown in online ad spending and challenges from Apple’s iOS changes.

Twitter: 3,700 jobs cut

Shortly after closing his $44 billion purchase of Twitter in late October, new owner Elon Musk cut around 3,700 Twitter employees, according to internal communications viewed by CNBC. That’s about half the staff. Since then, significantly more employees have quit after Musk changed some company policies around working from home and wrote that he expected all employees to commit to a “hardcore” work environment.

In a tweet on Nov. 4, Musk said there was “no choice” but to lay off employees, as the company was losing $4 milion per day.

Lyft: 700 jobs cut

Lyft announced in November that it cut 13% of its staff, or about 700 jobs. In a letter to employees, CEO Logan Green and President John Zimmer pointed to “a probable recession sometime in the next year” and rising rideshare insurance costs.

For laid-off workers, the ride-hailing company promised 10 weeks of pay, healthcare coverage through the end of April, accelerated equity vesting for the Nov. 20 vesting date and recruiting assistance. Workers who had been there for more than four years will get an extra four weeks of pay, they added.

Stripe: 1,100 jobs cut

Online payments giant Stripe announced plans to lay off roughly 14% of its staff, which amounts to about 1,100 employees, in November.

CEO Patrick Collison wrote in a memo to staff that the cuts were necessary amid rising inflation, fears of a looming recession, higher interest rates, energy shocks, tighter investment budgets and sparser startup funding. Taken together, these factors signal “that 2022 represents the beginning of a different economic climate,” he said.

Stripe was valued at $95 billion last year, and reportedly lowered its internal valuation to $74 billion in July.

Shopify: 1,000 jobs cut

In July, Shopify announced it laid off 1,000 workers, which equals 10% of its global employees.

In a memo to staff, CEO Tobi Lutke acknowledged he had misjudged how long the pandemic-driven e-commerce boom would last, and said the company is being hit by a broader pullback in online spending. The company’s stock price is down 78% in 2022.

Netflix: 450 jobs cut

Netflixtwo rounds of layoffs. In May, the streaming service eliminated 150 jobs after Netflix reported its first subscriber loss in a decade. In late June, Netflix announced another 300 layoffs.

In a statement to employees the company said, “While we continue to invest significantly in the business, we made these adjustments so that our costs are growing in line with our slower revenue growth.”

Snap: 1,000 jobs cut

In late August, Snap announced it laid off 20% of its workforce, which equates to over 1,000 employees.

Snap

Robinhood: 1,100 jobs cut

Retail brokerage firm Robinhood cut 23% of its staff in August, after slashing 9% of its workforce in April. Based on public filings and reports, that amounts to more than 1,100 employees.

Robinhood CEO Vlad Tenev blamed “deterioration of the macro environment, with inflation at 40-year highs accompanied by a broad crypto market crash.”

Tesla: 6,000 jobs cut

In June, TeslaElon Musk wrote in an email to all employees that the company is cutting 10% of salaried workers. The Wall Street Journal estimated the cuts would come to about 6,000 employees, based on public filings.

“Tesla will be reducing salaried headcount by 10% as we have become overstaffed in many areas,” Musk wrote. “Note this does not apply to anyone actually building cars, battery packs or installing solar. Hourly headcount will increase.”

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